It’s been a long time coming. Due to the PBA (finally) adopting FIBA’s application as a standard (or at least, a regular) part of their score keeping methods. This opened up an entire avenue of unused and unprocessed data that could shed light to things that have never been done before in the PBA. One of them, was how terribly underused the PBA corner three is.

Again, even if the PBA has a perfectly circular arc, much of the value of a corner three is not based on the shorter shot, but rather the fact that players shoot more OPEN shots from that spot because of geometry and the construction of a basketball game and court.

Nevertheless, HB Stats is formally announcing and introducing Shot Charts to the public! As of now, we only have the shot charts for teams (both offensive shot charts, i.e. shots taken, and defensive shot charts, i.e. shots allowed) but we’ll be expanding it to players. Here’s a brief introduction of how to use it (and how to read it):

Shot Charts

shot charts 1

Once you click on the link, you’ll immediately be greeted by a shot chart. This is the league shot chart for the current conference (i.e. this shows us what the “league” average is at each spot). You can then have the option of filtering by:

1. Tournament or Custom Date

– For now, the available tournament will just be the current conference (2014-15 Philippine Cup). You can however select a custom date (e.g. what is Purefood’s shot chart during their 4-game winning streak).

– You can then further filter whether you want an elimination round shot chart or a playoff shot chart (Not Yet Available).

2. Team

– You can filter by team. Marvel at the league leading offense (and league leader in eFG) of the Talk ‘n Text Tropang Texters.

TNT

3. Offense/Defense

You can also choose between an offensive shot chart (shots taken) and defensive shot charts (shots allowed). The bloody work of the Beermen defense.

SMB D

For Chart Types, we have three (3) basic layouts:

  • HB Zones – We’ve divided this to four basic parts: At The Rim (0-5 feet), Close Range (5-15 feet), 16+ 2PT shots and 3PT shots. The long shots have five subdivisions each: middle, two shoulders (left and right) and two elbows. For the close range attempts, there are only three: left, middle and right. To read this, note that the color range is from red → yellow → green (below average → average → above average). You can have the option of viewing a shot distribution (percentage of shots taken from each zone) instead of shot performance.
  • Basic Zones – This chart type is very similar to the HB Zones chart type except this type of chart type only has three parts: At The Rim (0-5 feet), 3PT shots and other shots (basically, Close and 16+ 2PT shots for the HB Zones). The 3PT shots are further subdivided into above-the-break threes (basically non-corner) and corner threes. Everything else is the same: color range is from red → yellow → green (below average → average → above average). You can have the option of viewing a shot distribution (percentage of shots taken from each zone) instead of shot performance.
  • Heat Map – This gives a “histogram” (on two-dimensional bins instead of just one) of where shots were taken and how good were shots from that spot. Unlike the first two chart types, the color range for this is different: dark blue (bad) → light blue (below average) → yellow (average) → orange (above average) → red (excellent).

You then have the option of exporting this as a .PNG or .SVG file for you to share!


We still have a lot of projects on the dock:

  1. Individual Player Shot Charts
  2. Lineup Points per Possession Data

We’re also working closely with the team handling the UAAP data to bring this very same facility to the public. Hopefully, this new tool (no matter how small) will help shed some light on some of our questions.

Enjoy!